Happy New Year and vacation – by Rabbi Karen Soria

Happy New Year and vacation-week movies! Which ones have you seen? I managed to see the third installment in The Hobbit trilogy and have decided it is definitely time to read the entire Lord of the Rings books again.

But the movie I haven’t seen yet is the one on my mind: Into the Woods. I love the stage show, am a bit hesitant about Disney’s handling of the story, and will nevertheless see it. Just not yet.

There is a song in Into the Woods that is particularly poignant at this time of starting a new year; as one character sings about an unexpected experience she has just had, she expresses, very simply and eloquently, some ideas about memory. For the experience, she realizes, was just a ‘moment’ and the entirety of our lives are comprised of just that – moments. And yet, ‘if life were only moments, we’d never know we had one.’

This is the delicate balance that a new year (be it secular, Jewish, fiscal, etc.) calls to mind: that our lives are indeed only moments – that the present moment is a gift (“that’s why it’s called the present”) – but that somehow we make a whole, however broken or whole, out of those moments.

Remember 2014. Cherish the good moments. Relinquish the bad ones. Put them together into your memories so that they will help you find the 2015 you are looking for. We may indeed have to all go ‘into the woods’ of darkness and challenge at times, but we don’t have to go alone, or defenceless.

May we all have a happy, healthy, and peaceful New Year!

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Thank a Jewish Mother: Poppy Remembrance on Remembrance Day by Rabbi Karen Soria

Those poppies we wear for Remembrance Day? Without the incredible work of Lillian Freiman, we would only read about them in John McCrae’s poem, “In Flanders Field.”

Freiman helped found the Royal Canadian Legion and was its first female honourary lifemember. She held leadership roles in the Canadian Institue for the Blind, the Red Cross Society, Canadian Hadassah-WIZO, the Amputations Association of Great War Veterans of Canada, the Salvation Army, Girl Guides of Canada, the Big Sister’s Association, the YMCA, the Joan of Arc Society, and more. The Mayor of Ottawa selected her to organize a 1500-volunteer relief effort during the flu epidemic of 1918. Lillian Freiman was the first Jewish-Canadian honoured as an officer of the Order of the British Empire; King George V presented it to her on New Year’s Day, 1934, for her work with war veterans.

In 1921, the first Canadian poppies were made in her living room; she had helped to establish the Vetcraft Shops, where returning servicemen made furniture and toys in 1919, and in 1923 the Vetcraft Shops took over the poppy-making.

At her funeral in 1940, red poppies covered her coffin and a Royal Canadian Legion honour guard attended (as did Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King, innumerable luminaries of the day, and many of the 151 Ukrainian war orphans she had rescued).

On December 29, 1941 Major-General L.F. LaFleche, Associate Deputy Minister of National War Services, unveiled a tablet at Trafalgar House inscribed: “In loving memory and to the honour of Mrs. A.J. (Lillian) Freiman, OBE, national officer and general convener in Ottawa of Canadian Legion Poppy Day. The friend of all soldiers and dependents who, in public and in private gave generous, warm-hearted and always effectual service and assistance in their cause from the days of 1914-18 to the day of her passing November 2nd, 1940.”

Any military officer or guest is welcome in her home to this day – it is now the Army Officers’ Mess in Ottawa.

As you wear your poppy, remember the dreams and sacrifices of those who did and do serve in the Canadian Armed Forces, as well as the vision, generosity, and accomplishments of one Jewish woman, Lillian Freiman, OBE. And thank a Jewish mother.

Of Water and Women by Rabbi Karen Soria

Does it pass the ‘would you want this as a headline on the first page of the newspaper?’ test? Does it pass the ‘would you want your mother to know this?’ test? Does it pass the ‘appearance’ test? If the answer to all three is ‘yes,’ then it (whatever it is) may be all right; but Rabbi Barry Freundel’s activities overseeing the mikveh and conversion process pass none of those tests. http://www.jta.org/2014/10/21/default/op-ed-what-the-freundel-scandal-says-about-orthodoxy-1

Anger, betrayal, humiliation, violation ~ to name just a few of the emotions that the revelations and allegations of his setting up recording equipment in the changing room of the mikveh have raised. Those who hold the most power over our lives – whether by love or authority – are those who have the power to betray us on the deepest level. If the mikveh is a “women’s commandment” as it has been promoted to be, then men should not be in control of it. Rabbi Elyse Goldstein has argued eloquently for a new approach to the mikveh http://blogs.timesofisrael.com/take-back-the-waters/ .

But back to that ‘appearance’ test. Judaism has a concept called ‘ma’arit ayin’ – what something looks like. Really, perhaps there is a need for a digital clock in the changing room. Perhaps there is a need to security cameras. But need has to be weighed against the appearance. And the supervising rabbi setting up and removing digital equipment is ‘ma’arit ayin.’ It just looks bad, even before the investigation concludes, before his day in court.

I know ~ we all make mistakes ~ but if we kept those three questions in mind and made the ‘appearance’ test part of our daily lives, we could save ourselves a whole lot of tsures, or trouble. Pity Rabbi Freundel didn’t think about ‘ma’arit ayin.’

Torah Reflections – Shabbat Bereshit

Stop! Before we completely forget our Rosh HaShanah through Yom Kippur through Sukkot through Simchat Torah journey, join me in one final (for this year) reflection.

The title of the story “If Not Higher” reminds us that through the High Holydays, we become more true to our spiritual selves. Really – why do we fast on Yom Kippur? One reason is that we don’t ‘need’ physical nourishment – we are beyond that. Yom Kippur concludes and we have four days to make a very physical shelter, the Sukkah, where ideally we are to take meals and sleep for seven days. Nothing like a temporary shelter in Winnipeg in October to get in touch with one’s physical vulnerability!

A popular maxim says, “We are spiritual beings on a human journey.” Judaism also emphasizes that we are human beings on a spiritual journey. Neither one nor the other exclusively; our human and spiritual task is to bind the two, for neither is true by itself. When we are physically weakest (perhaps) after fasting, we are to ‘get out and build that Sukkah.’ And then, after experiencing our physical limitations and vulnerability with the Sukkah, we are to lift and dance and celebrate with the Torah.

Opposites that are not opposites; a balance of needs and ability; what a great way to start a new year!
Shabbat shalom!