Candles, Hanukkiyah, Dreidels, Gelt – blog post Dec. 2014 by Rabbi Karen Soria

  • Candles
  • Hanukkiyah
  • Dreidels
  • Gelt

 

Yup ~ I must be all ready for Hanukkah! Oh wait ~ I didn’t include reading the story again.

But what story shall I read or tell? The truth is, we know that the beginnings of Hanukkah lie in internecine conflict, as the reigning Seleucids (the governing powers in the East, following the division of Alexander the Great’s empire after his death) found ready supporters among the Jews of the land of Israel. Political intrigue, brother against brother, murder – the real Hanukkah story has it all. Over the past number of years, historians have put the whole torrid story together from the Books of the Maccabees, Josephus’s writings, and historical documents from the time from other nations.

Yet that is not the story we tell. We tell the story of the cruse of oil, found in the desecrated Temple in Jerusalem, that wondrously burned for 8 days, until new oil could be prepared for the 7-branched menorah there – a story we first read about in the Talmud, some 400 years or so after the events in question.

What gives?

Certainly by a century after events, the powerful Roman Empire brooked no opening for rebellion – although the Jews (and some others) would try. By the time of the Talmud, we had transformed our national dreams and memories into prayers and hopes for the time of redemption. It simply made no sense to glorify a war with its limited success. And so, Hanukkah became about the miracle of the oil.

The truth is, both stories have important things to teach us. Perhaps in these times of fundamentalism, when we see in both religious and secular worlds the violence and brutality that are visited on those seen as different in any way, we should study the historical story again, as a cautionary tale of the destruction that happens when we forget we are all one human family ~ no matter our race, gender, religion, sex, politics, nationality, etc. One human family.

‘Hanukkah’ comes from the Hebrew root meaning ‘education’ and ‘dedication.’ Couldn’t those ideas combined bring some light into our world?

 

  • Remembering and telling the story
Advertisements